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FEATURED SPEAKERS

Thomas Barone

Thomas Barone

Over 30 years ago, Tom Barone’s doctoral dissertation at Stanford University investigated the possibilities of literary non-fiction for researching and writing about educational matters. Since then he has explored, conceptually and through examples, a variety of narrative and arts-based approaches to contextualizing and theorizing about significant educational issues. He has written three books: Aesthetics, Politics, and Educational Inquiry: Essays and Examples; Touching Eternity: The Enduring Outcomes of Teaching (Outstanding Book Awards from Division B of AERA and the AERA Narrative Research Special Interest Group); and the forthcoming Arts Based Research, co-authored with Elliot Eisner for SAGE Press. As Professor of Education in the Arizona State University Mary Lou Fulton Institute and Graduate School of Education, Barone teaches courses in curriculum studies and qualitative research methods. He was recently honored with the 2010 AERA, Division B, Lifetime Achievement Award. Retiring to the status of Professor Emeritus in May 2011, he believes that he has been afforded the great privilege of conducting and hosting a conference that spotlights forward thinking qualitative research methodologists whose work he has long appreciated, and that provides an opportunity for the perspectives of new scholars to be heard.

Marie Battiste

Marie Battiste

Dr. Marie Battiste, a Mi'kmaq educator from Potlo’tek First Nations, Nova Scotia, is a full professor in the College of Education and Director of the Aboriginal Education Research Centre (AERC) at the University of Saskatchewan. Her research interests are in initiating institutional change in the decolonization of education, language and social justice policy and power, and postcolonial educational approaches that recognize and affirm political and cultural diversity and the collective healing required for transformation from colonial trauma. She has published widely, including the edited collection Reclaiming Indigenous Voice and Vision, a special edition of the Australian Journal of Indigenous Education (May 2005), and as senior editor for First Nations Education in Canada: The Circle Unfolds.

Jean Clandinin

Jean Clandinin

Jean Clandinin is Professor and Director of the Centre for Research for Teacher Education and Development at the University of Alberta. She is co-author with Michael Connelly of four books including Narrative Inquiry. Composing Diverse Identities: Narrative Inquiries into the Interwoven Lives of Children and Teachers (2006) drew on research with children and teachers in urban schools. She edited the 2007 Handbook of Narrative Inquiry: Mapping a Methodology. With AERA, she was a Vice President of Division B; the 1993 winner of the Early Career Award; and she was awarded the 2002 Division B Lifetime Achievement Award.

Elliot Eisner

Elliot Eisner

Elliot W. Eisner is the Lee Jacks Professor of Education and Professor of Art at Stanford University. Professor Eisner was trained as a painter at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and he received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. He is the author or editor of sixteen books, including The Educational Imagination, The Enlightened Eye, Cognition and Curriculum, The Kind of Schools We Need, and The Arts and the Creation of Mind. Professor Eisner has received many prestigious awards for his work, among them a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, a Senior Fulbright Fellowship, the Jose Vasconcelos Award from the World Cultural Council, the Harold McGraw Prize in Education, the Brock International prize in Education, and the Grawemeyer Award in Education from the University of Louisville.

Janet Miller

Janet Miller

Janet L. Miller is Professor of English & Education and Director of Research in the Department of Arts & Humanities, Teachers College, Columbia University. In 2010, Professor Miller was elected a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association. In 2008, she received AERA's Lifetime Achievement Award, (Division B, Curriculum Studies). She was elected Vice President of AERA for Division B (1997-1999), and President of the American Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies (2001-2007). As Managing Editor of Journal of Curriculum Theorizing (1978-1998), she also served as Program Chair of the JCT-sponsored Bergamo Annual Curriculum Theorizing Conference. Her scholarly interests include curriculum theory, with emphases on feminist poststructuralist autobiographical theorizing as well as qualitative/ narrative research theories, methodologies, and research representation problematics, especially in relation to teachers' and researchers' subjectivities. She has authored Creating Spaces and Finding Voices: Teachers Collaborating for Empowerment; Sounds of Silence Breaking: Women, Autobiography, Curriculum; and co-edited, with William Ayers, A Light in Dark Times: Maxine Greene and the Unfinished Conversation.

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FEATURED SPEAKERS